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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: note (0.01176 detik)
Found 4 items, similar to note.
English → Indonesian (Kamus Landak) Definition: note mencatat
English → Indonesian (quick) Definition: note bongmeh, catat, catatan, mencamkan, mencatat, mencerap, mengarah-arah, mengawaskan, perhatian
English → English (WordNet) Definition: note note n 1: a short personal letter; “drop me a line when you get there” [syn: short letter, line, billet] 2: a brief written record; “he made a note of the appointment” 3: a characteristic emotional quality; “it ended on a sour note”; “there was a note of gaiety in her manner”; “he detected a note of sarcasm” 4: a piece of paper money (especially one issued by a central bank); “he peeled off five one-thousand-zloty notes” [syn: bill, government note, bank bill, banker's bill, bank note, banknote, Federal Reserve note, greenback] 5: a notation representing the pitch and duration of a musical sound; “the singer held the note too long” [syn: musical note , tone] 6: a comment or instruction (usually added); “his notes were appended at the end of the article”; “he added a short notation to the address on the envelope” [syn: annotation, notation] 7: high status importance owing to marked superiority; “a scholar of great eminence” [syn: eminence, distinction, preeminence] 8: a tone of voice that shows what the speaker is feeling; “there was a note of uncertainty in his voice” 9: a promise to pay a specified amount on demand or at a certain time; “I had to co-sign his note at the bank” [syn: promissory note, note of hand] note v 1: make mention of; “She observed that his presentation took up too much time”; “They noted that it was a fine day to go sailing” [syn: observe, mention, remark] 2: notice or perceive; “She noted that someone was following her”; “mark my words” [syn: notice, mark] [ant: ignore] 3: observe with care or pay close attention to; “Take note of this chemical reaction” [syn: take note, observe] 4: make a written note of; “she noted everything the teacher said that morning” [syn: take down]
English → English (gcide) Definition: note Accommodation \Ac*com`mo*da"tion\, n. [L. accommodatio, fr. accommodare: cf. F. accommodation.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of fitting or adapting, or the state of being fitted or adapted; adaptation; adjustment; -- followed by to. “The organization of the body with accommodation to its functions.” --Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster] 2. Willingness to accommodate; obligingness. [1913 Webster] 3. Whatever supplies a want or affords ease, refreshment, or convenience; anything furnished which is desired or needful; -- often in the plural; as, the accommodations -- that is, lodgings and food -- at an inn. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] 4. An adjustment of differences; state of agreement; reconciliation; settlement. “To come to terms of accommodation.” --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 5. The application of a writer's language, on the ground of analogy, to something not originally referred to or intended. [1913 Webster] Many of those quotations from the Old Testament were probably intended as nothing more than accommodations. --Paley. [1913 Webster] 6. (Com.) (a) A loan of money. (b) An accommodation bill or note. [1913 Webster] Accommodation bill, or note (Com.), a bill of exchange which a person accepts, or a note which a person makes and delivers to another, not upon a consideration received, but for the purpose of raising money on credit. Accommodation coach, or train, one running at moderate speed and stopping at all or nearly all stations. Accommodation ladder (Naut.), a light ladder hung over the side of a ship at the gangway, useful in ascending from, or descending to, small boats. [1913 Webster] Raise \Raise\ (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Raised (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. Raising.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See Rise, and cf. Rear to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a higher place; to lift upward; to elevate; to heave; as, to raise a stone or weight. Hence, figuratively: [1913 Webster] (a) To bring to a higher condition or situation; to elevate in rank, dignity, and the like; to increase the value or estimation of; to promote; to exalt; to advance; to enhance; as, to raise from a low estate; to raise to office; to raise the price, and the like. [1913 Webster] This gentleman came to be raised to great titles. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster] The plate pieces of eight were raised three pence in the piece. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster] (b) To increase the strength, vigor, or vehemence of; to excite; to intensify; to invigorate; to heighten; as, to raise the pulse; to raise the voice; to raise the spirits or the courage; to raise the heat of a furnace. [1913 Webster] (c) To elevate in degree according to some scale; as, to raise the pitch of the voice; to raise the temperature of a room. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to rise up, or assume an erect position or posture; to set up; to make upright; as, to raise a mast or flagstaff. Hence: [1913 Webster] (a) To cause to spring up from a recumbent position, from a state of quiet, or the like; to awaken; to arouse. [1913 Webster] They shall not awake, nor be raised out of their sleep. --Job xiv. 12. [1913 Webster] (b) To rouse to action; to stir up; to incite to tumult, struggle, or war; to excite. [1913 Webster] He commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind. --Ps. cvii. 25. [1913 Webster] [AE]neas . . . employs his pains, In parts remote, to raise the Tuscan swains. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] (c) To bring up from the lower world; to call up, as a spirit from the world of spirits; to recall from death; to give life to. [1913 Webster] Why should it be thought a thing incredible with you, that God should raise the dead ? --Acts xxvi. 8. [1913 Webster] 3. To cause to arise, grow up, or come into being or to appear; to give rise to; to originate, produce, cause, effect, or the like. Hence, specifically: [1913 Webster] (a) To form by the accumulation of materials or constituent parts; to build up; to erect; as, to raise a lofty structure, a wall, a heap of stones. [1913 Webster] I will raise forts against thee. --Isa. xxix. 3. [1913 Webster] (b) To bring together; to collect; to levy; to get together or obtain for use or service; as, to raise money, troops, and the like. “To raise up a rent.” --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] (c) To cause to grow; to procure to be produced, bred, or propagated; to grow; as, to raise corn, barley, hops, etc.; toraise cattle. “He raised sheep.” “He raised wheat where none grew before.” --Johnson's Dict. [1913 Webster] Note: In some parts of the United States, notably in the Southern States, raise is also commonly applied to the rearing or bringing up of children. [1913 Webster] I was raised, as they say in Virginia, among the mountains of the North. --Paulding. [1913 Webster] (d) To bring into being; to produce; to cause to arise, come forth, or appear; -- often with up. [1913 Webster] I will raise them up a prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee. --Deut. xviii. 18. [1913 Webster] God vouchsafes to raise another world From him [Noah], and all his anger to forget. --Milton. [1913 Webster] (e) To give rise to; to set agoing; to occasion; to start; to originate; as, to raise a smile or a blush. [1913 Webster] Thou shalt not raise a false report. --Ex. xxiii. 1. [1913 Webster] (f) To give vent or utterance to; to utter; to strike up. [1913 Webster] Soon as the prince appears, they raise a cry. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] (g) To bring to notice; to submit for consideration; as, to raise a point of order; to raise an objection. [1913 Webster] 4. To cause to rise, as by the effect of leaven; to make light and spongy, as bread. [1913 Webster] Miss Liddy can dance a jig, and raise paste. --Spectator. [1913 Webster] 5. (Naut.) (a) To cause (the land or any other object) to seem higher by drawing nearer to it; as, to raise Sandy Hook light. (b) To let go; as in the command, Raise tacks and sheets, i. e., Let go tacks and sheets. [1913 Webster] 6. (Law) To create or constitute; as, to raise a use, that is, to create it. --Burrill. [1913 Webster] To raise a blockade (Mil.), to remove or break up a blockade, either by withdrawing the ships or forces employed in enforcing it, or by driving them away or dispersing them. To raise a check, note, bill of exchange, etc., to increase fraudulently its nominal value by changing the writing, figures, or printing in which the sum payable is specified. To raise a siege, to relinquish an attempt to take a place by besieging it, or to cause the attempt to be relinquished. To raise steam, to produce steam of a required pressure. To raise the wind, to procure ready money by some temporary expedient. [Colloq.] To raise Cain, or To raise the devil, to cause a great disturbance; to make great trouble. [Slang] [1913 Webster] Syn: To lift; exalt; elevate; erect; originate; cause; produce; grow; heighten; aggravate; excite. [1913 Webster]

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