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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: our (0.01115 detik)
Found 3 items, similar to our.
English → Indonesian (Kamus Landak) Definition: our kami
English → Indonesian (quick) Definition: our kami
English → English (gcide) Definition: Our I \I\ ([imac]), pron. [poss. My (m[imac]) or Mine (m[imac]n); object. Me (m[=e]). pl. nom. We (w[=e]); poss. Our (our) or Ours (ourz); object. Us ([u^]s).] [OE. i, ich, ic, AS. ic; akin to OS. & D. ik, OHG. ih, G. ich, Icel. ek, Dan. jeg, Sw. jag, Goth. ik, OSlav. az', Russ. ia, W. i, L. ego, Gr. 'egw`, 'egw`n, Skr. aham. [root]179. Cf. Egoism.] The nominative case of the pronoun of the first person; the word with which a speaker or writer denotes himself. [1913 Webster] Our \Our\ (our), possessive pron. [AS. [=u]re our, of us; akin to [=u]s us, to us, and to G. unser our, of us, Goth. unsara. [root]186. See Us.] Of or pertaining to us; belonging to us; as, our country; our rights; our troops; our endeavors. See I. [1913 Webster] The Lord is our defense. --Ps. lxxxix. 18. [1913 Webster] Note: When the noun is not expressed, ours is used in the same way as hers for her, yours for your, etc.; as, whose house is that? It is ours. [1913 Webster] Our wills are ours, we know not how. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster] We \We\ (w[=e]), pron.; pl. of I. [Poss. Our (our) or Ours (ourz); obj. Us ([u^]s). See I.] [As. w[=e]; akin to OS. w[=i], OFries. & LG. wi, D. wij, G. wir, Icel. v[=e]r, Sw. & Dan. vi, Goth. weis, Skr. vayam. [root]190.] The plural nominative case of the pronoun of the first person; the word with which a person in speaking or writing denotes a number or company of which he is one, as the subject of an action expressed by a verb. [1913 Webster] Note: We is frequently used to express men in general, including the speaker. We is also often used by individuals, as authors, editors, etc., in speaking of themselves, in order to avoid the appearance of egotism in the too frequent repetition of the pronoun I. The plural style is also in use among kings and other sovereigns, and is said to have been begun by King John of England. Before that time, monarchs used the singular number in their edicts. The German and the French sovereigns followed the example of King John in a. d. 1200. [1913 Webster]

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