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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: dance (0.01818 detik)
Found 4 items, similar to dance.
English → Indonesian (Kamus Landak) Definition: dance menari
English → Indonesian (quick) Definition: dance berdansa, dansa, menari, tarian
English → English (WordNet) Definition: dance dance n 1: an artistic form of nonverbal communication 2: a party of people assembled for dancing 3: taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music [syn: dancing, terpsichore, saltation] 4: a party for social dancing dance v 1: move in a graceful and rhythmical way; “The young girl danced into the room” 2: move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; “My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio” [syn: trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe ] 3: skip, leap, or move up and down or sideways; “Dancing flames”; “The children danced with joy”
English → English (gcide) Definition: Dance Dance \Dance\, n. [F. danse, of German origin. See Dance, v. i.] 1. The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mus.) A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc. [1913 Webster] Note: The word dance was used ironically, by the older writers, of many proceedings besides dancing. [1913 Webster] Of remedies of love she knew parchance For of that art she couth the olde dance. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Dance of Death (Art), an allegorical representation of the power of death over all, -- the old, the young, the high, and the low, being led by a dancing skeleton. Morris dance. See Morris. To lead one a dance, to cause one to go through a series of movements or experiences as if guided by a partner in a dance not understood. [1913 Webster] Dance \Dance\, v. t. To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about, or up and down; to dandle. [1913 Webster] To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Thy grandsire loved thee well; Many a time he danced thee on his knee. --Shak. [1913 Webster] To dance attendance, to come and go obsequiously; to be or remain in waiting, at the beck and call of another, with a view to please or gain favor. [1913 Webster] A man of his place, and so near our favor, To dance attendance on their lordships' pleasure. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Dance \Dance\ (d[.a]ns), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Danced; p. pr. & vb. n. Dancing.] [F. danser, fr. OHG. dans[=o]n to draw; akin to dinsan to draw, Goth. apinsan, and prob. from the same root (meaning to stretch) as E. thin. See Thin.] 1. To move with measured steps, or to a musical accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company with others, with a regulated succession of movements, (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap rhythmically. [1913 Webster] Jack shall pipe and Gill shall dance. --Wither. [1913 Webster] Good shepherd, what fair swain is this Which dances with your daughter? --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion; to caper; to frisk; to skip about. [1913 Webster] Then, 'tis time to dance off. --Thackeray. [1913 Webster] More dances my rapt heart Than when I first my wedded mistress saw. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Shadows in the glassy waters dance. --Byron. [1913 Webster] Where rivulets dance their wayward round. --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster] To dance on a rope, or To dance on nothing, to be hanged. [1913 Webster]

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