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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: To run down (0.01445 detik)
Found 1 items, similar to To run down.
English → English (gcide) Definition: To run down Run \Run\, v. i. [imp. Ranor Run; p. p. Run; p. pr. & vb. n. Running.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin to D. runnen, rennen, OS. & OHG. rinnan, G. rinnen, rennen, Icel. renna, rinna, Sw. rinna, r["a]nna, Dan. rinde, rende, Goth. rinnan, and perh. to L. oriri to rise, Gr. ? to stir up, rouse, Skr. ? (cf. Origin), or perh. to L. rivus brook (cf. Rival). [root]11. Cf. Ember, a., Rennet.] 1. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Specifically: [1913 Webster] 2. Of voluntary or personal action: (a) To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten. [1913 Webster] “Ha, ha, the fox!” and after him they ran. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] (b) To flee, as from fear or danger. [1913 Webster] As from a bear a man would run for life. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (c) To steal off; to depart secretly. [1913 Webster] (d) To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress. [1913 Webster] Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain. --1 Cor. ix. 24. [1913 Webster] (e) To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt. [1913 Webster] Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast, to rend my heart with grief and run distracted? --Addison. [1913 Webster] (f) To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, to run through life; to run in a circle. (g) To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another. [1913 Webster] Virgil, in his first Georgic, has run into a set of precepts foreign to his subject. --Addison. [1913 Webster] (h) To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on. (i) To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on. (j) To creep, as serpents. [1913 Webster] 3. Of involuntary motion: (a) To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold. (b) To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread. [1913 Webster] The fire ran along upon the ground. --Ex. ix. 23. [1913 Webster] (c) To become fluid; to melt; to fuse. [1913 Webster] As wax dissolves, as ice begins to run. --Addison. [1913 Webster] Sussex iron ores run freely in the fire. --Woodward. [1913 Webster] (d) To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round. (e) To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago. (f) To extend; to reach; as, the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary. [1913 Webster] She saw with joy the line immortal run, Each sire impressed, and glaring in his son. --Pope. [1913 Webster] (g) To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station. (h) To make progress; to proceed; to pass. [1913 Webster] As fast as our time runs, we should be very glad in most part of our lives that it ran much faster. --Addison. [1913 Webster] (i) To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week. [1913 Webster] When we desire anything, our minds run wholly on the good circumstances of it; when it is obtained, our minds run wholly on the bad ones. --Swift. [1913 Webster] (j) To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west. [1913 Webster] Where the generally allowed practice runs counter to it. --Locke. [1913 Webster] Little is the wisdom, where the flight So runs against all reason. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (k) To be in form thus, as a combination of words. [1913 Webster] The king's ordinary style runneth, “Our sovereign lord the king.” --Bp. Sanderson. [1913 Webster] (l) To be popularly known; to be generally received. [1913 Webster] Men gave them their own names, by which they run a great while in Rome. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster] Neither was he ignorant what report ran of himself. --Knolles. [1913 Webster] (m) To have growth or development; as, boys and girls run up rapidly. [1913 Webster] If the richness of the ground cause turnips to run to leaves. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster] (n) To tend, as to an effect or consequence; to incline. [1913 Webster] A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] Temperate climates run into moderate governments. --Swift. [1913 Webster] (o) To spread and blend together; to unite; as, colors run in washing. [1913 Webster] In the middle of a rainbow the colors are . . . distinguished, but near the borders they run into one another. --I. Watts. [1913 Webster] (p) To have a legal course; to be attached; to continue in force, effect, or operation; to follow; to go in company; as, certain covenants run with the land. [1913 Webster] Customs run only upon our goods imported or exported, and that but once for all; whereas interest runs as well upon our ships as goods, and must be yearly paid. --Sir J. Child. [1913 Webster] (q) To continue without falling due; to hold good; as, a note has thirty days to run. (r) To discharge pus or other matter; as, an ulcer runs. (s) To be played on the stage a number of successive days or nights; as, the piece ran for six months. (t) (Naut.) To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing closehauled; -- said of vessels. [1913 Webster] 4. Specifically, of a horse: To move rapidly in a gait in which each leg acts in turn as a propeller and a supporter, and in which for an instant all the limbs are gathered in the air under the body. --Stillman (The Horse in Motion). [1913 Webster] 5. (Athletics) To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; -- so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. [1913 Webster] As things run, according to the usual order, conditions, quality, etc.; on the average; without selection or specification. To let run (Naut.), to allow to pass or move freely; to slacken or loosen. To run after, to pursue or follow; to search for; to endeavor to find or obtain; as, to run after similes. --Locke. To run away, to flee; to escape; to elope; to run without control or guidance. To run away with. (a) To convey away hurriedly; to accompany in escape or elopement. (b) To drag rapidly and with violence; as, a horse runs away with a carriage. To run down. (a) To cease to work or operate on account of the exhaustion of the motive power; -- said of clocks, watches, etc. (b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or To run into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run into To meet, by chance; as, I ran into my brother at the grocery store. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or To run mad on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. “Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.” --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. [1913 Webster] And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. [1913 Webster] But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. “Its rivers ran with gold.” --J. H. Newman. [1913 Webster] Run \Run\, v. t. 1. To cause to run (in the various senses of Run, v. i.); as, to run a horse; to run a stage; to run a machine; to run a rope through a block. [1913 Webster] 2. To pursue in thought; to carry in contemplation. [1913 Webster] To run the world back to its first original. --South. [1913 Webster] I would gladly understand the formation of a soul, and run it up to its “punctum saliens.” --Collier. [1913 Webster] 3. To cause to enter; to thrust; as, to run a sword into or through the body; to run a nail into the foot. [1913 Webster] You run your head into the lion's mouth. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] Having run his fingers through his hair. --Dickens. [1913 Webster] 4. To drive or force; to cause, or permit, to be driven. [1913 Webster] They ran the ship aground. --Acts xxvii. 41. [1913 Webster] A talkative person runs himself upon great inconveniences by blabbing out his own or other's secrets. --Ray. [1913 Webster] Others, accustomed to retired speculations, run natural philosophy into metaphysical notions. --Locke. [1913 Webster] 5. To fuse; to shape; to mold; to cast; as, to run bullets, and the like. [1913 Webster] The purest gold must be run and washed. --Felton. [1913 Webster] 6. To cause to be drawn; to mark out; to indicate; to determine; as, to run a line. [1913 Webster] 7. To cause to pass, or evade, offical restrictions; to smuggle; -- said of contraband or dutiable goods. [1913 Webster] Heavy impositions . . . are a strong temptation of running goods. --Swift. [1913 Webster] 8. To go through or accomplish by running; as, to run a race; to run a certain career. [1913 Webster] 9. To cause to stand as a candidate for office; to support for office; as, to run some one for Congress. [Colloq. U.S.] [1913 Webster] 10. To encounter or incur, as a danger or risk; as, to run the risk of losing one's life. See To run the chances, below. “He runneth two dangers.” --Bacon. [1913 Webster] If we don't succeed, we run the risk of failure. --Dan Quail . [PJC] 11. To put at hazard; to venture; to risk. [1913 Webster] He would himself be in the Highlands to receive them, and run his fortune with them. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster] 12. To discharge; to emit; to give forth copiously; to be bathed with; as, the pipe or faucet runs hot water. [1913 Webster] At the base of Pompey's statua, Which all the while ran blood, great C[ae]sar fell. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 13. To be charged with, or to contain much of, while flowing; as, the rivers ran blood. [1913 Webster] 14. To conduct; to manage; to carry on; as, to run a factory or a hotel. [Colloq. U.S.] [1913 Webster] 15. To tease with sarcasms and ridicule. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] 16. To sew, as a seam, by passing the needle through material in a continuous line, generally taking a series of stitches on the needle at the same time. [1913 Webster] 17. To migrate or move in schools; -- said of fish; esp., to ascend a river in order to spawn. [1913 Webster] 18. (Golf) To strike (the ball) in such a way as to cause it to run along the ground, as when approaching a hole. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] To run a blockade, to get to, or away from, a blockaded port in safety. To run down. (a) (Hunting) To chase till the object pursued is captured or exhausted; as, to run down a stag. (b) (Naut.) To run against and sink, as a vessel. (c) To crush; to overthrow; to overbear. “Religion is run down by the license of these times.” --Berkeley. (d) To disparage; to traduce. --F. W. Newman. To run hard. (a) To press in competition; as, to run one hard in a race. (b) To urge or press importunately. (c) To banter severely. To run into the ground, to carry to an absurd extreme; to overdo. [Slang, U.S.] (c) To erect hastily, as a building. [1913 Webster]

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