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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: C (0.01028 detik)
Found 2 items, similar to C.
English → English (WordNet) Definition: C C n 1: a degree on the Centigrade scale of temperature [syn: degree Centigrade , degree Celsius] 2: the speed at which light travels in a vacuum; the constancy and universality of the speed of light is recognized by defining it to be exactly 299,792,458 meters per second [syn: speed of light, light speed] 3: one of the four nucleotides used in building DNA; all four nucleotides have a common phosphate group and a sugar (ribose) [syn: deoxycytidine monophosphate] 4: a base found in DNA and RNA and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with guanine [syn: cytosine] 5: an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds [syn: carbon, atomic number 6 ] 6: ten 10s [syn: hundred, 100, century, one C, centred] 7: a unit of electrical charge equal to the amount of charge transferred by a current of 1 ampere in 1 second [syn: coulomb, ampere-second] 8: a general-purpose programing language closely associated with the UNIX operating system 9: the 3rd letter of the Roman alphabet 10: street names for cocaine [syn: coke, blow, nose candy, snow]
English → English (gcide) Definition: C Language \Lan"guage\, n. [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See Tongue, cf. Lingual.] [1913 Webster] 1. Any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech; the expression of ideas by the voice; sounds, expressive of thought, articulated by the organs of the throat and mouth. [1913 Webster] Note: Language consists in the oral utterance of sounds which usage has made the representatives of ideas. When two or more persons customarily annex the same sounds to the same ideas, the expression of these sounds by one person communicates his ideas to another. This is the primary sense of language, the use of which is to communicate the thoughts of one person to another through the organs of hearing. Articulate sounds are represented to the eye by letters, marks, or characters, which form words. [1913 Webster] 2. The expression of ideas by writing, or any other instrumentality. [1913 Webster] 3. The forms of speech, or the methods of expressing ideas, peculiar to a particular nation. [1913 Webster] 4. The characteristic mode of arranging words, peculiar to an individual speaker or writer; manner of expression; style. [1913 Webster] Others for language all their care express. --Pope. [1913 Webster] 5. The inarticulate sounds by which animals inferior to man express their feelings or their wants. [1913 Webster] 6. The suggestion, by objects, actions, or conditions, of ideas associated therewith; as, the language of flowers. [1913 Webster] There was . . . language in their very gesture. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 7. The vocabulary and phraseology belonging to an art or department of knowledge; as, medical language; the language of chemistry or theology. [1913 Webster] 8. A race, as distinguished by its speech. [R.] [1913 Webster] All the people, the nations, and the languages, fell down and worshiped the golden image. --Dan. iii. 7. [1913 Webster] 9. Any system of symbols created for the purpose of communicating ideas, emotions, commands, etc., between sentient agents. [PJC] 10. Specifically: (computers) Any set of symbols and the rules for combining them which are used to specify to a computer the actions that it is to take; also referred to as a computer lanugage or programming language; as, JAVA is a new and flexible high-level language which has achieved popularity very rapidly. [PJC] Note: Computer languages are classed a low-level if each instruction specifies only one operation of the computer, or high-level if each instruction may specify a complex combination of operations. Machine language and assembly language are low-level computer languages. FORTRAN, COBOL and C are high-level computer languages. Other computer languages, such as JAVA, allow even more complex combinations of low-level operations to be performed with a single command. Many programs, such as databases, are supplied with special languages adapted to manipulate the objects of concern for that specific program. These are also high-level languages. [PJC] Language master, a teacher of languages. [Obs.] Syn: Speech; tongue; idiom; dialect; phraseology; diction; discourse; conversation; talk. Usage: Language, Speech, Tongue, Idiom, Dialect. Language is generic, denoting, in its most extended use, any mode of conveying ideas; speech is the language of articulate sounds; tongue is the Anglo-Saxon term for language, esp. for spoken language; as, the English tongue. Idiom denotes the forms of construction peculiar to a particular language; dialects are varieties of expression which spring up in different parts of a country among people speaking substantially the same language. [1913 Webster] Symbol \Sym"bol\ (s[i^]m"b[o^]l), n. [L. symbolus, symbolum, Gr. sy`mbolon a sign by which one knows or infers a thing, from symba`llein to throw or put together, to compare; sy`n with + ba`llein to throw: cf. F. symbole. Cf. Emblem, Parable.] 1. A visible sign or representation of an idea; anything which suggests an idea or quality, or another thing, as by resemblance or by convention; an emblem; a representation; a type; a figure; as, the lion is the symbol of courage; the lamb is the symbol of meekness or patience. [1913 Webster] A symbol is a sign included in the idea which it represents, e. g., an actual part chosen to represent the whole, or a lower form or species used as the representative of a higher in the same kind. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster] 2. (Math.) Any character used to represent a quantity, an operation, a relation, or an abbreviation. [1913 Webster] Note: In crystallography, the symbol of a plane is the numerical expression which defines its position relatively to the assumed axes. [1913 Webster] 3. (Theol.) An abstract or compendium of faith or doctrine; a creed, or a summary of the articles of religion. [1913 Webster] 4. [Gr. ? contributions.] That which is thrown into a common fund; hence, an appointed or accustomed duty. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] They do their work in the days of peace . . . and come to pay their symbol in a war or in a plague. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster] 5. Share; allotment. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The persons who are to be judged . . . shall all appear to receive their symbol. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster] 6. (Chem.) An abbreviation standing for the name of an element and consisting of the initial letter of the Latin or New Latin name, or sometimes of the initial letter with a following one; as, C for carbon, Na for sodium (Natrium), Fe for iron (Ferrum), Sn for tin (Stannum), Sb for antimony (Stibium), etc. See the list of names and symbols under Element. [1913 Webster] Note: In pure and organic chemistry there are symbols not only for the elements, but also for their grouping in formulas, radicals, or residues, as evidenced by their composition, reactions, synthesis, etc. See the diagram of Benzene nucleus, under Benzene. [1913 Webster] Syn: Emblem; figure; type. See Emblem. [1913 Webster] C \C\ (s[=e]) 1. C is the third letter of the English alphabet. It is from the Latin letter C, which in old Latin represented the sounds of k, and g (in go); its original value being the latter. In Anglo-Saxon words, or Old English before the Norman Conquest, it always has the sound of k. The Latin C was the same letter as the Greek [Gamma], [gamma], and came from the Greek alphabet. The Greeks got it from the Ph[oe]nicians. The English name of C is from the Latin name ce, and was derived, probably, through the French. Etymologically C is related to g, h, k, q, s (and other sibilant sounds). Examples of these relations are in L. acutus, E. acute, ague; E. acrid, eager, vinegar; L. cornu, E. horn; E. cat, kitten; E. coy, quiet; L. circare, OF. cerchier, E. search. [1913 Webster] Note: See Guide to Pronunciation, [sect][sect] 221-228. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mus.) (a) The keynote of the normal or “natural” scale, which has neither flats nor sharps in its signature; also, the third note of the relative minor scale of the same. (b) C after the clef is the mark of common time, in which each measure is a semibreve (four fourths or crotchets); for alla breve time it is written ?. (c) The “C clef,” a modification of the letter C, placed on any line of the staff, shows that line to be middle C. [1913 Webster] 3. As a numeral, C stands for Latin centum or 100, CC for 200, etc. [1913 Webster] C spring, a spring in the form of the letter C. [1913 Webster] higher programming language \higher programming language\ n. (Computers) a computer programming language with an instruction set allowing one instruction to code for several assembly language instructions. Note: The aggregation of several assembly-language instructions into one instruction allows much greater efficiency in writing computer programs. Most programs are now written in some higher programming language, such as BASIC, FORTRAN, COBOL, C, C++, or JAVA. [PJC] higher programming language \higher programming language\ n. (Computers) a computer programming language with an instruction set allowing one instruction to code for several assembly language instructions. Note: The aggregation of several assembly-language instructions into one instruction allows much greater efficiency in writing computer programs. Most programs are now written in some higher programming language, such as BASIC, FORTRAN, COBOL, C, C++, or JAVA. [PJC]

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