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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: Under the rose (0.01244 detik)
Found 1 items, similar to Under the rose.
English → English (gcide) Definition: Under the rose Rose \Rose\, n. [AS. rose, L. rosa, probably akin to Gr. ?, Armor. vard, OPer. vareda; and perhaps to E. wort: cf. F. rose, from the Latin. Cf. Copperas, Rhododendron.] 1. A flower and shrub of any species of the genus Rosa, of which there are many species, mostly found in the morthern hemispere [1913 Webster] Note: Roses are shrubs with pinnate leaves and usually prickly stems. The flowers are large, and in the wild state have five petals of a color varying from deep pink to white, or sometimes yellow. By cultivation and hybridizing the number of petals is greatly increased and the natural perfume enhanced. In this way many distinct classes of roses have been formed, as the Banksia, Baurbon, Boursalt, China, Noisette, hybrid perpetual, etc., with multitudes of varieties in nearly every class. [1913 Webster] 2. A knot of ribbon formed like a rose; a rose knot; a rosette, esp. one worn on a shoe. --Sha. [1913 Webster] 3. (Arch.) A rose window. See Rose window, below. [1913 Webster] 4. A perforated nozzle, as of a pipe, spout, etc., for delivering water in fine jets; a rosehead; also, a strainer at the foot of a pump. [1913 Webster] 5. (Med.) The erysipelas. --Dunglison. [1913 Webster] 6. The card of the mariner's compass; also, a circular card with radiating lines, used in other instruments. [1913 Webster] 7. The color of a rose; rose-red; pink. [1913 Webster] 8. A diamond. See Rose diamond, below. [1913 Webster] Cabbage rose, China rose, etc. See under Cabbage, China, etc. Corn rose (Bot.) See Corn poppy, under Corn. Infantile rose (Med.), a variety of roseola. Jamaica rose. (Bot.) See under Jamaica. Rose acacia (Bot.), a low American leguminous shrub (Robinia hispida) with handsome clusters of rose-colored blossoms. Rose aniline. (Chem.) Same as Rosaniline. Rose apple (Bot.), the fruit of the tropical myrtaceous tree Eugenia Jambos. It is an edible berry an inch or more in diameter, and is said to have a very strong roselike perfume. Rose beetle. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small yellowish or buff longlegged beetle (Macrodactylus subspinosus), which eats the leaves of various plants, and is often very injurious to rosebushes, apple trees, grapevines, etc. Called also rose bug, and rose chafer. (b) The European chafer. Rose bug. (Zo["o]l.) same as Rose beetle, Rose chafer. Rose burner, a kind of gas-burner producing a rose-shaped flame. Rose camphor (Chem.), a solid odorless substance which separates from rose oil. Rose campion. (Bot.) See under Campion. Rose catarrh (Med.), rose cold. Rose chafer. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A common European beetle (Cetonia aurata) which is often very injurious to rosebushes; -- called also rose beetle, and rose fly. (b) The rose beetle (a) . Rose cold (Med.), a variety of hay fever, sometimes attributed to the inhalation of the effluvia of roses. See Hay fever, under Hay. Rose color, the color of a rose; pink; hence, a beautiful hue or appearance; fancied beauty, attractiveness, or promise. Rose de Pompadour, Rose du Barry, names succesively given to a delicate rose color used on S[`e]vres porcelain. Rose diamond, a diamond, one side of which is flat, and the other cut into twenty-four triangular facets in two ranges which form a convex face pointed at the top. Cf. Brilliant, n. Rose ear. See under Ear. Rose elder (Bot.), the Guelder-rose. Rose engine, a machine, or an appendage to a turning lathe, by which a surface or wood, metal, etc., is engraved with a variety of curved lines. --Craig. Rose family (Bot.) the Rosece[ae]. See Rosaceous. Rose fever (Med.), rose cold. Rose fly (Zo["o]l.), a rose betle, or rose chafer. Rose gall (Zo["o]l.), any gall found on rosebushes. See Bedeguar. Rose knot, a ribbon, or other pliade band plaited so as to resemble a rose; a rosette. Rose lake, Rose madder, a rich tint prepared from lac and madder precipitated on an earthy basis. --Fairholt. Rose mallow. (Bot.) (a) A name of several malvaceous plants of the genus Hibiscus, with large rose-colored flowers. (b) the hollyhock. Rose nail, a nail with a convex, faceted head. Rose noble, an ancient English gold coin, stamped with the figure of a rose, first struck in the reign of Edward III., and current at 6s. 8d. --Sir W. Scott. Rose of China. (Bot.) See China rose (b), under China. Rose of Jericho (Bot.), a Syrian cruciferous plant (Anastatica Hierochuntica) which rolls up when dry, and expands again when moistened; -- called also resurrection plant . Rose of Sharon (Bot.), an ornamental malvaceous shrub (Hibiscus Syriacus). In the Bible the name is used for some flower not yet identified, perhaps a Narcissus, or possibly the great lotus flower. Rose oil (Chem.), the yellow essential oil extracted from various species of rose blossoms, and forming the chief part of attar of roses. Rose pink, a pigment of a rose color, made by dyeing chalk or whiting with a decoction of Brazil wood and alum; also, the color of the pigment. Rose quartz (Min.), a variety of quartz which is rose-red. Rose rash. (Med.) Same as Roseola. Rose slug (Zo["o]l.), the small green larva of a black sawfly (Selandria ros[ae]). These larv[ae] feed in groups on the parenchyma of the leaves of rosebushes, and are often abundant and very destructive. Rose window (Arch.), a circular window filled with ornamental tracery. Called also Catherine wheel, and marigold window. Cf. wheel window, under Wheel. Summer rose (Med.), a variety of roseola. See Roseola. Under the rose [a translation of L. sub rosa], in secret; privately; in a manner that forbids disclosure; -- the rose being among the ancients the symbol of secrecy, and hung up at entertainments as a token that nothing there said was to be divulged. Wars of the Roses (Eng. Hist.), feuds between the Houses of York and Lancaster, the white rose being the badge of the House of York, and the red rose of the House of Lancaster. [1913 Webster] Under \Un"der\, prep. [AS. under, prep. & adv.; akin to OFries. under, OS. undar, D. onder, G. unter, OHG. untar, Icel. undir, Sw. & Dan. under, Goth. undar, L. infra below, inferior lower, Skr. adhas below. [root]201. Cf. Inferior.] 1. Below or lower, in place or position, with the idea of being covered; lower than; beneath; -- opposed to over; as, he stood under a tree; the carriage is under cover; a cellar extends under the whole house. [1913 Webster] Fruit put in bottles, and the bottles let down into wells under water, will keep long. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] Be gathered now, ye waters under heaven, Into one place. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, in many figurative uses which may be classified as follows; [1913 Webster] (a) Denoting relation to some thing or person that is superior, weighs upon, oppresses, bows down, governs, directs, influences powerfully, or the like, in a relation of subjection, subordination, obligation, liability, or the like; as, to travel under a heavy load; to live under extreme oppression; to have fortitude under the evils of life; to have patience under pain, or under misfortunes; to behave like a Christian under reproaches and injuries; under the pains and penalties of the law; the condition under which one enters upon an office; under the necessity of obeying the laws; under vows of chastity. [1913 Webster] Both Jews and Gentiles . . . are all under sin. --Rom. iii. 9. [1913 Webster] That led the embattled seraphim to war Under thy conduct. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Who have their provand Only for bearing burdens, and sore blows For sinking under them. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (b) Denoting relation to something that exceeds in rank or degree, in number, size, weight, age, or the like; in a relation of the less to the greater, of inferiority, or of falling short. [1913 Webster] Three sons he dying left under age. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] Medicines take effect sometimes under, and sometimes above, the natural proportion of their virtue. --Hooker. [1913 Webster] There are several hundred parishes in England under twenty pounds a year. --Swift. [1913 Webster] It was too great an honor for any man under a duke. --Addison. [1913 Webster] Note: Hence, it sometimes means at, with, or for, less than; as, he would not sell the horse under sixty dollars. [1913 Webster] Several young men could never leave the pulpit under half a dozen conceits. --Swift. [1913 Webster] (c) Denoting relation to something that comprehends or includes, that represents or designates, that furnishes a cover, pretext, pretense, or the like; as, he betrayed him under the guise of friendship; Morpheus is represented under the figure of a boy asleep. [1913 Webster] A crew who, under names of old renown . . . abused Fanatic Egypt. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Mr. Duke may be mentioned under the double capacity of a poet and a divine. --Felton. [1913 Webster] Under this head may come in the several contests and wars betwixt popes and the secular princes. --C. Leslie. [1913 Webster] (d) Less specifically, denoting the relation of being subject, of undergoing regard, treatment, or the like; as, a bill under discussion. [1913 Webster] Abject and lost, lay these, covering the flood, Under amazement of their hideous change. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Under arms. (Mil.) (a) Drawn up fully armed and equipped. (b) Enrolled for military service; as, the state has a million men under arms. Under canvas. (a) (Naut.) Moved or propelled by sails; -- said of any vessel with her sail set, but especially of a steamer using her sails only, as distinguished from one under steam. Under steam and canvas signifies that a vessel is using both means of propulsion. (b) (Mil.) Provided with, or sheltered in, tents. Under fire, exposed to an enemy's fire; taking part in a battle or general engagement. Under foot. See under Foot, n. Under ground, below the surface of the ground. Under one's signature, with one's signature or name subscribed; attested or confirmed by one's signature. Cf. the second Note under Over, prep. Under sail. (Naut.) (a) With anchor up, and under the influence of sails; moved by sails; in motion. (b) With sails set, though the anchor is down. (c) Same as Under canvas (a), above. --Totten. Under sentence, having had one's sentence pronounced. Under the breath, with low voice; very softly. Under the lee (Naut.), to the leeward; as, under the lee of the land. Under the rose. See under Rose, n. Under water, below the surface of the water. Under way, or Under weigh (Naut.), in a condition to make progress; having started. [1913 Webster]

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