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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: To make out (0.01331 detik)
Found 1 items, similar to To make out.
English → English (gcide) Definition: To make out Out \Out\ (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. About, But, prep., Carouse, Utter, a.] In its original and strict sense, out means from the interior of something; beyond the limits or boundary of somethings; in a position or relation which is exterior to something; -- opposed to in or into. The something may be expressed after of, from, etc. (see Out of, below); or, if not expressed, it is implied; as, he is out; or, he is out of the house, office, business, etc.; he came out; or, he came out from the ship, meeting, sect, party, etc. Out is used in a variety of applications, as: [1913 Webster] 1. Away; abroad; off; from home, or from a certain, or a usual, place; not in; not in a particular, or a usual, place; as, the proprietor is out, his team was taken out. Opposite of in. “My shoulder blade is out.” --Shak. [1913 Webster] He hath been out (of the country) nine years. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Beyond the limits of concealment, confinement, privacy, constraint, etc., actual or figurative; hence, not in concealment, constraint, etc., in, or into, a state of freedom, openness, disclosure, publicity, etc.; a matter of public knowledge; as, the sun shines out; he laughed out, to be out at the elbows; the secret has leaked out, or is out; the disease broke out on his face; the book is out. [1913 Webster] Leaves are out and perfect in a month. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] She has not been out [in general society] very long. --H. James. [1913 Webster] 3. Beyond the limit of existence, continuance, or supply; to the end; completely; hence, in, or into, a condition of extinction, exhaustion, completion; as, the fuel, or the fire, has burned out; that style is on the way out. “Hear me out.” --Dryden. [1913 Webster] Deceitful men shall not live out half their days. --Ps. iv. 23. [1913 Webster] When the butt is out, we will drink water. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. Beyond possession, control, or occupation; hence, in, or into, a state of want, loss, or deprivation; -- used of office, business, property, knowledge, etc.; as, the Democrats went out and the Whigs came in; he put his money out at interest. “Land that is out at rack rent.” --Locke. “He was out fifty pounds.” --Bp. Fell. [1913 Webster] I have forgot my part, and I am out. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. Beyond the bounds of what is true, reasonable, correct, proper, common, etc.; in error or mistake; in a wrong or incorrect position or opinion; in a state of disagreement, opposition, etc.; in an inharmonious relation. “Lancelot and I are out.” --Shak. [1913 Webster] Wicked men are strangely out in the calculating of their own interest. --South. [1913 Webster] Very seldom out, in these his guesses. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 6. Not in the position to score in playing a game; not in the state or turn of the play for counting or gaining scores. [1913 Webster] 7. Out of fashion; unfashionable; no longer in current vogue; unpopular. [PJC] Note: Out is largely used in composition as a prefix, with the same significations that it has as a separate word; as outbound, outbreak, outbuilding, outcome, outdo, outdoor, outfield. See also the first Note under Over, adv. [1913 Webster] Day in, day out, from the beginning to the limit of each of several days; day by day; every day. Out at, Out in, Out on, etc., elliptical phrases, that to which out refers as a source, origin, etc., being omitted; as, out (of the house and) at the barn; out (of the house, road, fields, etc., and) in the woods. Three fishers went sailing out into the west, Out into the west, as the sun went down. --C. Kingsley. Note: In these lines after out may be understood, “of the harbor,” “from the shore,” “of sight,” or some similar phrase. The complete construction is seen in the saying: “Out of the frying pan into the fire.” Out from, a construction similar to out of (below). See Of and From. Out of, a phrase which may be considered either as composed of an adverb and a preposition, each having its appropriate office in the sentence, or as a compound preposition. Considered as a preposition, it denotes, with verbs of movement or action, from the interior of; beyond the limit: from; hence, origin, source, motive, departure, separation, loss, etc.; -- opposed to in or into; also with verbs of being, the state of being derived, removed, or separated from. Examples may be found in the phrases below, and also under Vocabulary words; as, out of breath; out of countenance. Out of cess, beyond measure, excessively. --Shak. Out of character, unbecoming; improper. Out of conceit with, not pleased with. See under Conceit. Out of date, not timely; unfashionable; antiquated. Out of door, Out of doors, beyond the doors; from the house; not inside a building; in, or into, the open air; hence, figuratively, shut out; dismissed. See under Door, also, Out-of-door, Outdoor, Outdoors, in the Vocabulary. “He 's quality, and the question's out of door,” --Dryden. Out of favor, disliked; under displeasure. Out of frame, not in correct order or condition; irregular; disarranged. --Latimer. Out of hand, immediately; without delay or preparation; without hesitation or debate; as, to dismiss a suggestion out of hand. “Ananias . . . fell down and died out of hand.” --Latimer. Out of harm's way, beyond the danger limit; in a safe place. Out of joint, not in proper connection or adjustment; unhinged; disordered. “The time is out of joint.” --Shak. Out of mind, not in mind; forgotten; also, beyond the limit of memory; as, time out of mind. Out of one's head, beyond commanding one's mental powers; in a wandering state mentally; delirious. [Colloq.] Out of one's time, beyond one's period of minority or apprenticeship. Out of order, not in proper order; disarranged; in confusion. Out of place, not in the usual or proper place; hence, not proper or becoming. Out of pocket, in a condition of having expended or lost more money than one has received. Out of print, not in market, the edition printed being exhausted; -- said of books, pamphlets, etc. Out of the question, beyond the limits or range of consideration; impossible to be favorably considered. Out of reach, beyond one's reach; inaccessible. Out of season, not in a proper season or time; untimely; inopportune. Out of sorts, wanting certain things; unsatisfied; unwell; unhappy; cross. See under Sort, n. Out of temper, not in good temper; irritated; angry. Out of time, not in proper time; too soon, or too late. Out of time, not in harmony; discordant; hence, not in an agreeing temper; fretful. Out of twist, Out of winding, or Out of wind, not in warped condition; perfectly plain and smooth; -- said of surfaces. Out of use, not in use; unfashionable; obsolete. Out of the way. (a) On one side; hard to reach or find; secluded. (b) Improper; unusual; wrong. Out of the woods, not in a place, or state, of obscurity or doubt; free from difficulty or perils; safe. [Colloq.] Out to out, from one extreme limit to another, including the whole length, breadth, or thickness; -- applied to measurements. Out West, in or towards, the West; specifically, in some Western State or Territory. [U. S.] To come out, To cut out, To fall out, etc. See under Come, Cut, Fall, etc. To make out See to make out under make, v. t. and v. i.. To put out of the way, to kill; to destroy. Week in, week out. See Day in, day out (above). [1913 Webster] make \make\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. made (m[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. making.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. mak?n, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahh?n to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. Match an equal.] 1. To cause to exist; to bring into being; to form; to produce; to frame; to fashion; to create. Hence, in various specific uses or applications: (a) To form of materials; to cause to exist in a certain form; to construct; to fabricate. [1913 Webster] He . . . fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf. --Ex. xxxii. 4. [1913 Webster] (b) To produce, as something artificial, unnatural, or false; -- often with up; as, to make up a story. [1913 Webster] And Art, with her contending, doth aspire To excel the natural with made delights. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] (c) To bring about; to bring forward; to be the cause or agent of; to effect, do, perform, or execute; -- often used with a noun to form a phrase equivalent to the simple verb that corresponds to such noun; as, to make complaint, for to complain; to make record of, for to record; to make abode, for to abide, etc. [1913 Webster] Call for Samson, that he may make us sport. --Judg. xvi. 25. [1913 Webster] Wealth maketh many friends. --Prov. xix. 4. [1913 Webster] I will neither plead my age nor sickness in excuse of the faults which I have made. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] (d) To execute with the requisite formalities; as, to make a bill, note, will, deed, etc. (e) To gain, as the result of one's efforts; to get, as profit; to make acquisition of; to have accrue or happen to one; as, to make a large profit; to make an error; to make a loss; to make money. [1913 Webster] He accuseth Neptune unjustly who makes shipwreck a second time. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] (f) To find, as the result of calculation or computation; to ascertain by enumeration; to find the number or amount of, by reckoning, weighing, measurement, and the like; as, he made the distance of; to travel over; as, the ship makes ten knots an hour; he made the distance in one day. (h) To put in a desired or desirable condition; to cause to thrive. [1913 Webster] Who makes or ruins with a smile or frown. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to be or become; to put into a given state verb, or adjective; to constitute; as, to make known; to make public; to make fast. [1913 Webster] Who made thee a prince and a judge over us? --Ex. ii. 14. [1913 Webster] See, I have made thee a god to Pharaoh. --Ex. vii. 1. [1913 Webster] Note: When used reflexively with an adjective, the reflexive pronoun is often omitted; as, to make merry; to make bold; to make free, etc. [1913 Webster] 3. To cause to appear to be; to constitute subjectively; to esteem, suppose, or represent. [1913 Webster] He is not that goose and ass that Valla would make him. --Baker. [1913 Webster] 4. To require; to constrain; to compel; to force; to cause; to occasion; -- followed by a noun or pronoun and infinitive. [1913 Webster] Note: In the active voice the to of the infinitive is usually omitted. [1913 Webster] I will make them hear my words. --Deut. iv. 10. [1913 Webster] They should be made to rise at their early hour. --Locke. [1913 Webster] 5. To become; to be, or to be capable of being, changed or fashioned into; to do the part or office of; to furnish the material for; as, he will make a good musician; sweet cider makes sour vinegar; wool makes warm clothing. [1913 Webster] And old cloak makes a new jerkin. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 6. To compose, as parts, ingredients, or materials; to constitute; to form; to amount to; as, a pound of ham makes a hearty meal. [1913 Webster] The heaven, the air, the earth, and boundless sea, Make but one temple for the Deity. --Waller. [1913 Webster] 7. To be engaged or concerned in. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Gomez, what makest thou here, with a whole brotherhood of city bailiffs? --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 8. To reach; to attain; to arrive at or in sight of. “And make the Libyan shores.” --Dryden. [1913 Webster] They that sail in the middle can make no land of either side. --Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster] To make a bed, to prepare a bed for being slept on, or to put it in order. To make a card (Card Playing), to take a trick with it. To make account. See under Account, n. To make account of, to esteem; to regard. To make away. (a) To put out of the way; to kill; to destroy. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] If a child were crooked or deformed in body or mind, they made him away. --Burton. [1913 Webster] (b) To alienate; to transfer; to make over. [Obs.] --Waller. To make believe, to pretend; to feign; to simulate. To make bold, to take the liberty; to venture. To make the cards (Card Playing), to shuffle the pack. To make choice of, to take by way of preference; to choose. To make danger, to make experiment. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl. To make default (Law), to fail to appear or answer. To make the doors, to shut the door. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Make the doors upon a woman's wit, and it will out at the casement. --Shak. [1913 Webster] To make free with. See under Free, a. To make good. See under Good. To make head, to make headway. To make light of. See under Light, a. To make little of. (a) To belittle. (b) To accomplish easily. To make love to. See under Love, n. To make meat, to cure meat in the open air. [Colloq. Western U. S.] To make merry, to feast; to be joyful or jovial. To make much of, to treat with much consideration,, attention, or fondness; to value highly. To make no bones. See under Bone, n. To make no difference, to have no weight or influence; to be a matter of indifference. To make no doubt, to have no doubt. To make no matter, to have no weight or importance; to make no difference. To make oath (Law), to swear, as to the truth of something, in a prescribed form of law. To make of. (a) To understand or think concerning; as, not to know what to make of the news. (b) To pay attention to; to cherish; to esteem; to account. “Makes she no more of me than of a slave.” --Dryden. To make one's law (Old Law), to adduce proof to clear one's self of a charge. To make out. (a) To find out; to discover; to decipher; as, to make out the meaning of a letter. (b) to gain sight of; to recognize; to discern; to descry; as, as they approached the city, he could make out the tower of the Chrysler Building. (c) To prove; to establish; as, the plaintiff was unable to make out his case. (d) To make complete or exact; as, he was not able to make out the money. (d) to write out; to write down; -- used especially of a bank check or bill; as, he made out a check for the cost of the dinner; the workman made out a bill and handed it to him. To make over, to transfer the title of; to convey; to alienate; as, he made over his estate in trust or in fee. To make sail. (Naut.) (a) To increase the quantity of sail already extended. (b) To set sail. To make shift, to manage by expedients; as, they made shift to do without it. [Colloq.]. To make sternway, to move with the stern foremost; to go or drift backward. To make strange, to act in an unfriendly manner or as if surprised; to treat as strange; as, to make strange of a request or suggestion. To make suit to, to endeavor to gain the favor of; to court. To make sure. See under Sure. To make up. (a) To collect into a sum or mass; as, to make up the amount of rent; to make up a bundle or package. (b) To reconcile; to compose; as, to make up a difference or quarrel. (c) To supply what is wanting in; to complete; as, a dollar is wanted to make up the stipulated sum. (d) To compose, as from ingredients or parts; to shape, prepare, or fabricate; as, to make up a mass into pills; to make up a story. [1913 Webster] He was all made up of love and charms! --Addison. [1913 Webster] (e) To compensate; to make good; as, to make up a loss. (f) To adjust, or to arrange for settlement; as, to make up accounts. (g) To dress and paint for a part, as an actor; as, he was well made up. To make up a face, to distort the face as an expression of pain or derision. To make up one's mind, to reach a mental determination; to resolve. To make way, or To make one's way. (a) To make progress; to advance. (b) To open a passage; to clear the way. To make words, to multiply words. [1913 Webster] Make \Make\ (m[=a]k), v. i. 1. To act in a certain manner; to have to do; to manage; to interfere; to be active; -- often in the phrase to meddle or make. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A scurvy, jack-a-nape priest to meddle or make. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To proceed; to tend; to move; to go; as, he made toward home; the tiger made at the sportsmen. [1913 Webster] Note: Formerly, authors used to make on, to make forth, to make about; but these phrases are obsolete. We now say, to make at, to make away, to make for, to make off, to make toward, etc. [1913 Webster] 3. To tend; to contribute; to have effect; -- with for or against; as, it makes for his advantage. --M. Arnold. [1913 Webster] Follow after the things which make for peace. --Rom. xiv. 19. [1913 Webster] Considerations infinite Do make against it. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. To increase; to augment; to accrue. [1913 Webster] 5. To compose verses; to write poetry; to versify. [Archaic] --Chaucer. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] To solace him some time, as I do when I make. --P. Plowman. [1913 Webster] To make as if, or To make as though, to pretend that; to make show that; to make believe (see under Make, v. t.). [1913 Webster] Joshua and all Israel made as if they were beaten before them, and fled. --Josh. viii. 15. [1913 Webster] My lord of London maketh as though he were greatly displeased with me. --Latimer. [1913 Webster] To make at, to go toward hastily, or in a hostile manner; to attack. To make away with. (a) To carry off. (b) To transfer or alienate; hence, to spend; to dissipate. (c) To kill; to destroy. To make off, to go away suddenly. To make out, to succeed; to manage oneself; to be able at last; to make shift; as, he made out to reconcile the contending parties; after the earthquake they made out all right. (b) to engage in fond caresses; to hug and kiss; to neck; -- of courting couples or individuals (for individuals, used with with); as, they made out on a bench in the park; he was making out with the waitress in the kitchen [informal] To make up, to become reconciled or friendly. To make up for, to compensate for; to supply an equivalent for. To make up to. (a) To approach; as, a suspicious boat made up to us. (b) To pay addresses to; to make love to. To make up with, to become reconciled to. [Colloq.] To make with, to concur or agree with. --Hooker. [1913 Webster]

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