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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: To bring to pass (0.01491 detik)
Found 1 items, similar to To bring to pass.
English → English (gcide) Definition: To bring to pass Pass \Pass\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Passed; p. pr. & vb. n. Passing.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See Pace.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point to another; to make a transit; -- usually with a following adverb or adverbal phrase defining the kind or manner of motion; as, to pass on, by, out, in, etc.; to pass swiftly, directly, smoothly, etc.; to pass to the rear, under the yoke, over the bridge, across the field, beyond the border, etc. ``But now pass over [i. e., pass on].'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] On high behests his angels to and fro Passed frequent. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Sweet sounds rose slowly through their mouths, And from their bodies passed. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster] 2. To move or be transferred from one state or condition to another; to change possession, condition, or circumstances; to undergo transition; as, the business has passed into other hands. [1913 Webster] Others, dissatisfied with what they have, . . . pass from just to unjust. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster] 3. To move beyond the range of the senses or of knowledge; to pass away; hence, to disappear; to vanish; to depart; specifically, to depart from life; to die. [1913 Webster] Disturb him not, let him pass paceably. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will pass. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] The passing of the sweetest soul That ever looked with human eyes. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 4. To move or to come into being or under notice; to come and go in consciousness; hence, to take place; to occur; to happen; to come; to occur progressively or in succession; to be present transitorily. [1913 Webster] So death passed upon all men. --Rom. v. 12. [1913 Webster] Our own consciousness of what passes within our own mind. --I. Watts. [1913 Webster] 5. To go by or glide by, as time; to elapse; to be spent; as, their vacation passed pleasantly. [1913 Webster] Now the time is far passed. --Mark vi. 35 [1913 Webster] 6. To go from one person to another; hence, to be given and taken freely; as, clipped coin will not pass; to obtain general acceptance; to be held or regarded; to circulate; to be current; -- followed by for before a word denoting value or estimation. “Let him pass for a man.” --Shak. [1913 Webster] False eloquence passeth only where true is not understood. --Felton. [1913 Webster] This will not pass for a fault in him. --Atterbury. [1913 Webster] 7. To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to validity or effectiveness; to be carried through a body that has power to sanction or reject; to receive legislative sanction; to be enacted; as, the resolution passed; the bill passed both houses of Congress. [1913 Webster] 8. To go through any inspection or test successfully; to be approved or accepted; as, he attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass. [1913 Webster] 9. To be suffered to go on; to be tolerated; hence, to continue; to live along. “The play may pass.” --Shak. [1913 Webster] 10. To go unheeded or neglected; to proceed without hindrance or opposition; as, we let this act pass. [1913 Webster] 11. To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess. [Obs.] “This passes, Master Ford.” --Shak. [1913 Webster] 12. To take heed; to care. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] As for these silken-coated slaves, I pass not. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 13. To go through the intestines. --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 14. (Law) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance; as, an estate passes by a certain clause in a deed. --Mozley & W. [1913 Webster] 15. (Fencing) To make a lunge or pass; to thrust. [1913 Webster] 16. (Card Playing) To decline to play in one's turn; in euchre, to decline to make the trump. [1913 Webster] She would not play, yet must not pass. --Prior. [1913 Webster] To bring to pass, To come to pass. See under Bring, and Come. To pass away, to disappear; to die; to vanish. “The heavens shall pass away.” --2 Pet. iii. 10. “I thought to pass away before, but yet alive I am.” --Tennyson. To pass by, to go near and beyond a certain person or place; as, he passed by as we stood there. To pass into, to change by a gradual transmission; to blend or unite with. To pass on, to proceed. To pass on or To pass upon. (a) To happen to; to come upon; to affect. “So death passed upon all men.” --Rom. v. 12. “Provided no indirect act pass upon our prayers to define them.” --Jer. Taylor. (b) To determine concerning; to give judgment or sentence upon. “We may not pass upon his life.” --Shak. To pass off, to go away; to cease; to disappear; as, an agitation passes off. To pass over, to go from one side or end to the other; to cross, as a river, road, or bridge. [1913 Webster] Bring \Bring\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Brought; p. pr. & vb. n. Bringing.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to be; to bear from a more distant to a nearer place; to fetch. [1913 Webster] And as she was going to fetch it, he called to her, and said, Bring me, I pray thee, a morsel of bread. --1 Kings xvii. 11. [1913 Webster] To France shall we convey you safe, And bring you back. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause the accession or obtaining of; to procure; to make to come; to produce; to draw to. [1913 Webster] There is nothing will bring you more honor . . . than to do what right in justice you may. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] 3. To convey; to move; to carry or conduct. [1913 Webster] In distillation, the water . . . brings over with it some part of the oil of vitriol. --Sir I. Newton. [1913 Webster] 4. To persuade; to induce; to draw; to lead; to guide. [1913 Webster] It seems so preposterous a thing . . . that they do not easily bring themselves to it. --Locke. [1913 Webster] The nature of the things . . . would not suffer him to think otherwise, how, or whensoever, he is brought to reflect on them. --Locke. [1913 Webster] 5. To produce in exchange; to sell for; to fetch; as, what does coal bring per ton? [1913 Webster] To bring about, to bring to pass; to effect; to accomplish. To bring back. (a) To recall. (b) To restore, as something borrowed, to its owner. To bring by the lee (Naut.), to incline so rapidly to leeward of the course, when a ship sails large, as to bring the lee side suddenly to the windward, any by laying the sails aback, expose her to danger of upsetting. To bring down. (a) To cause to come down. (b) To humble or abase; as, to bring down high looks. To bring down the house, to cause tremendous applause. [Colloq.] To bring forth. (a) To produce, as young fruit. (b) To bring to light; to make manifest. To bring forward (a) To exhibit; to introduce; to produce to view. (b) To hasten; to promote; to forward. (c) To propose; to adduce; as, to bring forward arguments. To bring home. (a) To bring to one's house. (b) To prove conclusively; as, to bring home a charge of treason. (c) To cause one to feel or appreciate by personal experience. (d) (Naut.) To lift of its place, as an anchor. To bring in. (a) To fetch from without; to import. (b) To introduce, as a bill in a deliberative assembly. (c) To return or repot to, or lay before, a court or other body; to render; as, to bring in a verdict or a report. (d) To take to an appointed place of deposit or collection; as, to bring in provisions or money for a specified object. (e) To produce, as income. (f) To induce to join. To bring off, to bear or convey away; to clear from condemnation; to cause to escape. To bring on. (a) To cause to begin. (b) To originate or cause to exist; as, to bring on a disease. To bring one on one's way, to accompany, guide, or attend one. To bring out, to expose; to detect; to bring to light from concealment. To bring over. (a) To fetch or bear across. (b) To convert by persuasion or other means; to cause to change sides or an opinion. To bring to. (a) To resuscitate; to bring back to consciousness or life, as a fainting person. (b) (Naut.) To check the course of, as of a ship, by dropping the anchor, or by counterbracing the sails so as to keep her nearly stationary (she is then said to lie to). (c) To cause (a vessel) to lie to, as by firing across her course. (d) To apply a rope to the capstan. To bring to light, to disclose; to discover; to make clear; to reveal. To bring a sail to (Naut.), to bend it to the yard. To bring to pass, to accomplish to effect. “Trust also in Him; and He shall bring it to pass.” --Ps. xxxvii. 5. To bring under, to subdue; to restrain; to reduce to obedience. To bring up. (a) To carry upward; to nurse; to rear; to educate. (b) To cause to stop suddenly. (c) Note: [v. i. by dropping the reflexive pronoun] To stop suddenly; to come to a standstill. [Colloq.] To bring up (any one) with a round turn, to cause (any one) to stop abruptly. [Colloq.] To be brought to bed. See under Bed. [1913 Webster] Syn: To fetch; bear; carry; convey; transport; import; procure; produce; cause; adduce; induce. [1913 Webster]

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