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Hasil cari dari kata atau frase: Mya arenaria (0.00989 detik)
Found 2 items, similar to Mya arenaria.
English → English (WordNet) Definition: Mya arenaria Mya arenaria n : an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe [syn: soft-shell clam , steamer, steamer clam, long-neck clam]
English → English (gcide) Definition: Mya arenaria Soft \Soft\ (s[o^]ft; 115), a. [Compar. Softer (s[o^]ft"[~e]r); superl. Softest.] [OE. softe, AS. s[=o]fte, properly adv. of s[=e]fte, adj.; akin to OS. s[=a]fto, adv., D. zacht, OHG. samfto, adv., semfti, adj., G. sanft, LG. sacht; of uncertain origin.] 1. Easily yielding to pressure; easily impressed, molded, or cut; not firm in resisting; impressible; yielding; also, malleable; -- opposed to hard; as, a soft bed; a soft peach; soft earth; soft wood or metal. [1913 Webster] 2. Not rough, rugged, or harsh to the touch; smooth; delicate; fine; as, soft silk; a soft skin. [1913 Webster] They that wear soft clothing are in king's houses. --Matt. xi. 8. [1913 Webster] 3. Hence, agreeable to feel, taste, or inhale; not irritating to the tissues; as, a soft liniment; soft wines. “The soft, delicious air.” --Milton. [1913 Webster] 4. Not harsh or offensive to the sight; not glaring; pleasing to the eye; not exciting by intensity of color or violent contrast; as, soft hues or tints. [1913 Webster] The sun, shining upon the upper part of the clouds . . . made the softest lights imaginable. --Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster] 5. Not harsh or rough in sound; gentle and pleasing to the ear; flowing; as, soft whispers of music. [1913 Webster] Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low, -- an excellent thing in woman. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Soft were my numbers; who could take offense? --Pope. [1913 Webster] 6. Easily yielding; susceptible to influence; flexible; gentle; kind. [1913 Webster] I would to God my heart were flint, like Edward's; Or Edward's soft and pitiful, like mine. --Shak. [1913 Webster] The meek or soft shall inherit the earth. --Tyndale. [1913 Webster] 7. Expressing gentleness, tenderness, or the like; mild; conciliatory; courteous; kind; as, soft eyes. [1913 Webster] A soft answer turneth away wrath. --Prov. xv. 1. [1913 Webster] A face with gladness overspread, Soft smiles, by human kindness bred. --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster] 8. Effeminate; not courageous or manly, weak. [1913 Webster] A longing after sensual pleasures is a dissolution of the spirit of a man, and makes it loose, soft, and wandering. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster] 9. Gentle in action or motion; easy. [1913 Webster] On her soft axle, white she paces even, And bears thee soft with the smooth air along. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 10. Weak in character; impressible. [1913 Webster] The deceiver soon found this soft place of Adam's. --Glanvill. [1913 Webster] 11. Somewhat weak in intellect. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] He made soft fellows stark noddies, and such as were foolish quite mad. --Burton. [1913 Webster] 12. Quiet; undisturbed; paceful; as, soft slumbers. [1913 Webster] 13. Having, or consisting of, a gentle curve or curves; not angular or abrupt; as, soft outlines. [1913 Webster] 14. Not tinged with mineral salts; adapted to decompose soap; as, soft water is the best for washing. [1913 Webster] 15. (Phonetics) (a) Applied to a palatal, a sibilant, or a dental consonant (as g in gem, c in cent, etc.) as distinguished from a guttural mute (as g in go, c in cone, etc.); -- opposed to hard. (b) Belonging to the class of sonant elements as distinguished from the surd, and considered as involving less force in utterance; as, b, d, g, z, v, etc., in contrast with p, t, k, s, f, etc. [1913 Webster] Soft clam (Zo["o]l.), the common or long clam (Mya arenaria ). See Mya. Soft coal, bituminous coal, as distinguished from anthracite, or hard, coal. Soft crab (Zo["o]l.), any crab which has recently shed its shell. Soft dorsal (Zo["o]l.), the posterior part of the dorsal fin of fishes when supported by soft rays. Soft grass. (Bot.) See Velvet grass. Soft money, paper money, as distinguished from coin, or hard money. [Colloq. U.S.] Soft mute. (Phonetics) See Media. Soft palate. See the Note under Palate. Soft ray (Zo["o]l.), a fin ray which is articulated and usually branched. Soft soap. See under Soap. Soft-tack, leavened bread, as distinguished from hard-tack, or ship bread. Soft tortoise (Zo["o]l.), any river tortoise of the genus Trionyx. See Trionyx. [1913 Webster] Long \Long\, a. [Compar. Longer; superl. Longest.] [AS. long, lang; akin to OS, OFries., D., & G. lang, Icel. langr, Sw. l[*a]ng, Dan. lang, Goth. laggs, L. longus. [root]125. Cf. Length, Ling a fish, Linger, Lunge, Purloin.] 1. Drawn out in a line, or in the direction of length; protracted; extended; as, a long line; -- opposed to short, and distinguished from broad or wide. [1913 Webster] 2. Drawn out or extended in time; continued through a considerable tine, or to a great length; as, a long series of events; a long debate; a long drama; a long history; a long book. [1913 Webster] 3. Slow in passing; causing weariness by length or duration; lingering; as, long hours of watching. [1913 Webster] 4. Occurring or coming after an extended interval; distant in time; far away. [1913 Webster] The we may us reserve both fresh and strong Against the tournament, which is not long. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] 5. Having a length of the specified measure; of a specified length; as, a span long; a yard long; a mile long, that is, extended to the measure of a mile, etc. [1913 Webster] 6. Far-reaching; extensive. “ Long views.” --Burke. [1913 Webster] 7. (Phonetics) Prolonged, or relatively more prolonged, in utterance; -- said of vowels and syllables. See Short, a., 13, and Guide to Pronunciation, [sect][sect] 22, 30. [1913 Webster] 8. (Finance & Com.) Having a supply of stocks or goods; prepared for, or depending for a profit upon, advance in prices; as, long of cotton. Hence, the phrases: to be, or go, long of the market, to be on the long side of the market, to hold products or securities for a rise in price, esp. when bought on a margin. Contrasted to short. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] Note: Long is used as a prefix in a large number of compound adjectives which are mostly of obvious meaning; as, long-armed, long-beaked, long-haired, long-horned, long-necked, long-sleeved, long-tailed, long- worded, etc. [1913 Webster] In the long run, in the whole course of things taken together; in the ultimate result; eventually. Long clam (Zo["o]l.), the common clam (Mya arenaria) of the Northern United States and Canada; -- called also soft-shell clam and long-neck clam. See Mya. Long cloth, a kind of cotton cloth of superior quality. Long clothes, clothes worn by a young infant, extending below the feet. Long division. (Math.) See Division. Long dozen, one more than a dozen; thirteen. Long home, the grave. Long measure, Long meter. See under Measure, Meter. Long Parliament (Eng. Hist.), the Parliament which assembled Nov. 3, 1640, and was dissolved by Cromwell, April 20, 1653. Long price, the full retail price. Long purple (Bot.), a plant with purple flowers, supposed to be the Orchis mascula. --Dr. Prior. Long suit (a) (Whist), a suit of which one holds originally more than three cards. --R. A. Proctor. (b) One's most important resource or source of strength; as, as an entertainer, her voice was her long suit. Long tom. (a) A pivot gun of great length and range, on the dock of a vessel. (b) A long trough for washing auriferous earth. [Western U.S.] (c) (Zo["o]l.) The long-tailed titmouse. Long wall (Coal Mining), a working in which the whole seam is removed and the roof allowed to fall in, as the work progresses, except where passages are needed. Of long, a long time. [Obs.] --Fairfax. To be long of the market, or To go long of the market, To be on the long side of the market, etc. (Stock Exchange), to hold stock for a rise in price, or to have a contract under which one can demand stock on or before a certain day at a stipulated price; -- opposed to short in such phrases as, to be short of stock, to sell short, etc. [Cant] See Short. To have a long head, to have a farseeing or sagacious mind. [1913 Webster] Clam \Clam\ (kl[a^]m), n. [Cf. Clamp, Clam, v. t., Clammy.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A bivalve mollusk of many kinds, especially those that are edible; as, the long clam (Mya arenaria), the quahog or round clam (Venus mercenaria), the sea clam or hen clam (Spisula solidissima), and other species of the United States. The name is said to have been given originally to the Tridacna gigas, a huge East Indian bivalve. [1913 Webster] You shall scarce find any bay or shallow shore, or cove of sand, where you may not take many clampes, or lobsters, or both, at your pleasure. --Capt. John Smith (1616). [1913 Webster] Clams, or clamps, is a shellfish not much unlike a cockle; it lieth under the sand. --Wood (1634). [1913 Webster] 2. (Ship Carp.) Strong pinchers or forceps. [1913 Webster] 3. pl. (Mech.) A kind of vise, usually of wood. [1913 Webster] Blood clam. See under Blood. [1913 Webster]

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